Issue 53 - Blogging and Social Media - Claire Cook, Krista Canfield, Dana Lynn Smith


AddThis Social Bookmark Button








Blogging in a Social Media Landscape - Samara O'Shea, Shira Lazar, Josie Loza, Krista Canfield


Sowing and Reaping the Ten Benefits of Blogging


Sowing and Reaping the Ten Benefits of Blogging

Summer 2012 Flash Fiction Contest Winners!

Facebook Best Practices for Profiles, Pages, Groups, and Posts for Writers


The Two Sides of Social Media - How to Be Your Own Publicist

WOW! Classes



2008 - 2012



Truly Useful Site Award

As Featured On Best Ezines



 

Go to wow-womenonwriting.comArticlesContestMarketsBlogClasses

   
   

SHARE |

Online markets that pay (and pay well) can be difficult to track down, which is why so many writers have fallen into the trap of writing for content farms.

Well, no more! Below are five fabulous online markets to jump-start/enhance your online writing portfolio.

Happy submitting, ladies!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Make a Living Writing

E-mail: carol@caroltice.com

Website: http://www.makealivingwriting.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TiceWrites

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/makealivingwriting

Monthly Page Views: 14,000

About Make a Living Writing

Practical help for hungry writers. All about real strategies for earning more.

Writer’s Guidelines: http://www.makealivingwriting.com/why-i-pay-writers

What to Pitch

Fresh and innovative ideas for how writers can overcome obstacles, learn new skills, break into new markets, get clients, and generally earn more. We’re looking for your first-person experience. Have a thorough understanding of what we’ve already written on recently—most successful pitchers are subscribers to the blog.

What Not to Pitch

A pitch without a proposed headline and outline (number one mistake), which is the only kind I will approve. Do not send completed articles—they will not be used or even read. Generic advice you’ve researched off the Internet that we’ve all seen a million times. A request that I give you a backlink to a site completely unrelated to writing.

Percentage Freelance-Written: 20%

Percentage of Freelance Pitches Accepted: Haven’t tracked it! Maybe 10 percent, counting all the junk/spam requests to guest post.

How to Pitch

Read and follow the guidelines carefully. Then send your best headline and outline.

Where to Direct Pitches

Editor: Carol Tice, carol@caroltice.com

Response Time: Usually within 24 hours

Pay Rate: $50 flat fee

Payment Schedule: On publication

Rights Purchased: First time 90 days and right to reproduce in future posts/e-books.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

RenewEveryDay.com

E-mail: editor@reneweveryday.com

Website: http://www.reneweveryday.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/reneweveryday

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RenewMagazine

About RenewEveryDay.com

The home of Renew magazine, a national magazine written for the addiction recovery community. Our stories support and celebrate the recovery lifestyle for those who live it and the people who support them.

Writer’s Guidelines: Sent upon acceptance of a pitch.

What to Pitch

Clearly articulated story ideas on sobriety, addiction recovery, nutrition, fitness, spiritual practice, psychology, addiction-related science and research, or personal essays about addiction and recovery.

What Not to Pitch

Please no full stories as pitches. Also, please spell check!

Percentage Freelance-Written: 75%

Percentage of Freelance Pitches Accepted: 30%

How to Pitch

Pitches should include a little bit about you and why you’re interested in writing for us, followed by a clear pitch—no more than a paragraph long— explaining the story you’re proposing. Pitches that also include a brief list of sources to be used in reporting the article are appreciated and given extra consideration.

Where to Direct Pitches

Editor: Hayley Grgurich, editor@reneweveryday.com

Response Time: It varies. But if we like the story, we’ll always get in touch.

Pay Rate: Varies based on length of story and difficulty of reporting.

Payment Schedule: Payment is issued 30 days after publication.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sasee

E-mail: editor@sasee.com

Website: http://www.sasee.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/saseewoman

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/saseemag

About Sasee

It’s all about women. It’s all about you.

Writer’s Guidelines: http://www.sasee.com/submissions/

What to Pitch

We accept freelance submissions of first person essays that revolve around the monthly themes and are of interest to women. I look for evocative essays that resonate with all women.

If chosen, the essay will appear in our print magazine and online. We publish only nine essays per month and receive fifty to one hundred, so the competition is fierce.

What Not to Pitch

Nothing with a political or religious theme will be considered.

How to Pitch

Submissions should be sent to Leslie Moore, editor, lmoore@strandmedia.com, and the essay should be pasted into the body of the e-mail. Please include the month of consideration, contact information, and a brief biography.

I would recommend a new writer read a few essays on our website first to get an idea of what we accept.

Where to Direct Pitches

Editor: Leslie C. Moore, lmoore@strandmedia.com

Response Time: We do our best to respond to all submissions promptly; but due to volume and deadlines, it’s not always possible to do so.

Pay Rate: $0.10/word

Payment Schedule: On publication

Rights Purchased: First North American Rights

Editorial Calendar: Click to Download Sasee’s Editorial Calendar (PDF)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

She’s Self-Employed

E-mail: contribute@shesselfemployed.com

Website: http://www.shesselfemployed.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ShesSelfEmplyed

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Shes-Self-Employed/125161654213972

About She’s Self-Employed

Self-employment doesn’t come with a handbook. In many ways, you’re on your own, working without a net. You’re not just the boss. You’re the boss of everything. She’s Self-Employed is a place where the woman entrepreneur can find relevant inspiration, information, and motivation.

This is a site for the woman who writes her check—literally and figuratively. We don’t want to talk down to you or lecture you. Solopreneurs or the start-ups are just as welcome here as the larger or more established businesses. We’re not trying to sell you some secret to success. And while we don’t plan to congratulate you just because you’re women in business, we understand that being a woman is part of your identity, not something to hide. What you do have here is a community of women telling their own stories, sharing information, experiences, and going through the same thing you are each day.

We feature a revolving door of entrepreneurs and experts writing about issues that interest self-employed businesswomen. Some of the authors are one-offs, and others are regular contributors. The aim is to have something for every aspect of female business ownership. Whether you just opened your own knit scarf business on Etsy today; you’re running your empire from your kitchen table; or if you’ve established yourself and now are looking for the next level, there’s something here for you.

Writer’s Guidelines: http://www.shesselfemployed.com/write-for-us/

What to Pitch

There’s a misconception that only women can write for She’s Self-Employed, but that’s not true. It’s also not limited to professional writers, entrepreneurs, or even the self-employed. Anyone who can write authoritatively about topics self-employed women can relate to can write for She’s Self-Employed. We have two types of articles we publish: columns and features. The columns are written by monthly columnists, and the shorter features are written by freelancers.

Right now we’re looking for specific, actionable, or inspiring information for the self-employed woman. We want content that can help any woman start and grow her business. Since we are looking for short articles (300 to 500 words), it’s important that each article be as specific as possible.

Let’s use Twitter as an example of an article topic. There is no way you’re going to explain how to use Twitter for business in 300 words, no matter how much you know. Instead, explain how strategically retweeting the right content can lead to a better reputation on the network, or why some businesses don’t need Twitter at all.

What Not to Pitch

Vague, poorly conceived articles that could be on any website referencing business. I can’t tell you how many pitches we get on balancing motherhood and business. Anything that has already been covered in depth on the site.

Percentage Freelance-Written: 80%

Percentage of Freelance Pitches Accepted: 50%

How to Pitch

Those interested in writing a column should send a short e-mail explaining which column they’d like to write, along with the reason they would be the best one suited to write it. You will be contacted if a space opens up.

The process to pitch a feature starts with a short e-mail pitching the article. Just explain who you are, what you want to submit, and when you can have it in. The reason we suggest pitching your article before you write it is that you may have a great topic or angle, but need a few tweaks before we can publish it for our audience.

Where to Direct Pitches

Publisher: Sherree Curtis, contribute@shesselfemployed.com

Response Time: 1 week

Pay Rate: $25 for features (300+ words), $50 for columns (600+ words)

Payment Schedule: The month after publication by PayPal

Rights Purchased: First North American Rights

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Renegade Writer

E-mail: lindaformichelli@gmail.com

Website: http://www.therenegadewriter.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/lformichelli

Monthly Page Views: 12,000

About The Renegade Writer

The Renegade Writer blog is for aspiring to pro freelance writers, but mostly newbies who want to write for magazines and websites. I secondarily cover copywriting and blogging for money. Posts are informational and motivational.

Writer’s Guidelines: http://www.therenegadewriter.com/guest-posting/

What to Pitch

Meaty how-to and motivational posts for freelance writers who may be struggling with time management, confidence, the business aspects of freelancing, marketing, productivity, etc. I run a few posts on the craft of writing, but not many.

What Not to Pitch

Please look through the archives—there are over a thousand posts, so I’ve already covered a lot of topics. I’m happy to revisit an idea if it has a twist to it, but for example, I don’t need another post on time management tips. Try to hone in on a narrow aspect of a topic that’s already been done.

Percentage Freelance-Written: 50%

Percentage of Freelance Pitches Accepted: 25%

How to Pitch

Please read the guidelines! I get a lot of totally off-topic pitches.

When you pitch, show, don’t just tell. For example, don’t tell me you’ll offer five ways to get over rejection. I want to know what at least some of those will be. I can’t judge an idea and know if it’s something fresh for the blog without knowing the details.

Also, include your credentials as a writer, and let me know if you can publicize your post on Twitter, Facebook, etc. If your post is accepted, be prepared to check in and reply to comments when your post goes live.

Where to Direct Pitches

Editor: Linda Formichelli, lformichelli@gmail.com

Response Time: 1 week

Pay Rate: $50 flat fee

Payment Schedule: On acceptance

Rights Purchased: Online rights

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If there’s a market you’d like to see featured in a future issue of WOW!, feel free to e-mail me your suggestions: info@krissybrady.com. Consider me your very own Lois Lane (but way nerdier!).

About Krissy Brady

Krissy Brady is the owner of Krissy Media Ink, a blog dedicated to simplifying the writing life. She’s also an e-book writer for Sterling & Stone, specializing in e-books for indie authors. Like most women, she wants to have it all . . . but first needs to figure out what that means. Keep in touch with Krissy on Facebook and Twitter for the latest writing-related information.


 

    About WOW! Women on Writing | Ad Rates | Contact Us | Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2012 wow-womenonwriting.com All rights reserved.

Graphic Design/Illustration by Mackintosh Multimedia.
Web Design/Programming by Glenn Robnett.