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Spring 2018 Flash Fiction Contest

Q3 2018 Creative Nonfiction Essay Contest

Winter 2018 Flash Fiction Contest


Q2 2018 Creative Nonfiction Essay Contest






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The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt. ~ Sylvia Plath

FLASH FICTION CONTEST

    FALL 2018 FLASH FICTION CONTEST WITH GUEST JUDGE LITERARY AGENT HEATHER FLAHERTY WITH THE BENT AGENCY

Do you need some writing inspiration? Contests are a great way to spark your creativity, and you may even win a prize! Get your best work together and consider entering the WOW! quarterly flash fiction contest with guest judge, literary agent Heather Flaherty with The Bent Agency. Stop by the contest page, download the pdf guidelines, and read all about Heather’s preferences. The Fall Contest is open to all genres of fiction between 250 - 750 words. Only 300 stories are accepted, so enter early to ensure your spot in the contest. Over $1350 in cash prizes. Deadline: November 30, 2018. MORE >>

     

CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST

    Q1 2018 CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST

WOW! is proud to introduce our newest essay contest! Writers have been asking us to host an essay contest for many years, and we’ve finally listened. The mission of this essay contest is to inspire creative nonfiction and provide well-rewarded recognition to contestants. The contest is open globally; age is of no matter; and entries must be in English. Your story must be true, but the way you tell it is your chance to get creative. We are open to all styles of essay—from personal essay to lyric essay to hybrid essay, and beyond! Word Count: 200 – 1,000 words. Only 300 stories are accepted, so enter early to ensure your spot in the contest. 1st Place: $500. Deadline: October 31, 2018. MORE >>

     

WRITING WORKSHOPS & ONLINE CLASSES

    WOW! WOMEN ON WRITING CLASSROOM

Whether you are looking to boost your income or work on your craft, we know that education is an important part of a writer’s career. That’s why WOW! handpicks qualified instructors and targeted classes that women writers will benefit from. All of the courses operate online and are taught one-on-one with the instructor. The flexibility of the platform allows students to complete assignments on their own time and work at their own pace in the comfort of their own home. Visit the classroom page and check out our current line up of workshops: fiction writing, writing for children, screenwriting, creativity, memoir, personal essay, grammar, food writing, freelance writing, novel writing, blogging, social networking for authors, independent publishing, branding for authors, poetry writing, copy editing, literary devices, working with a literary agent, writing scenes, book reviewing, travel writing and more. MORE >>

     

FEATURES

  1. HOW TO INCREASE YOUR WRITING PRODUCTIVITY

“There will never be a time when everything in your life is done, set, and perfectly in order, and you can just sit back, relax, and write,” warned Colleen M. Story, author of Overwhelmed Writer Rescue. All of us deal with the reality—go to work, take care of families, do cooking and cleaning—while pursuing our dreams as writers. Suggested methods of increasing productivity will help you make the most of the writing time you have now and create more writing time in the future. MORE >>

     
  2. SNAIL TO SPRINT: HOW TO WRITE YOUR FIRST DRAFT IN 4 WEEKS

I wrote the first draft of my historical novel, Hour Glass, in sixteen days. You read that correctly—sixteen days. My experimental novella, Tattoo, was written in about three weeks. Both have been released in 2018. Though I am intensely proud of this accomplishment, I’m not telling you to brag. I’m telling you that you can do this, too. Michelle Rene provides writers with tips on how to write a book fast, how to get started, time management, managing distractions, the middle stick, and how to keep moving forward. Authors Sara Bale and Janet Shawgo also share their best tips. MORE >>

     
  3. HOW TO WRITE FOR MAGAZINES THAT AREN’T IN YOUR DEMOGRAPHICS

Pitching and writing for a publication when you are among their target audience makes a writer’s job easier. Unfortunately, we can’t just rely on our age, gender, occupation, or interests to pay the bills. Since it can take a long time to get a response from an editor and see the article published, we need to pitch more often to make a decent living, even if it means leaving our beloved comfort zones far behind. I’ve talked to writers who broke into widely different markets: 20-year-olds writing for AARP, women writing for Esquire, the queen of frugality writing for an upscale wedding rental company, and more. MORE >>

     
  4. RADIATE THE QUESTION MARK: HOW SPECULATIVE MEMOIR OFFERS EXPLORATION, NOT ANSWERS - AN INTERVIEW WITH SOFIA SAMATAR

“Who hasn’t wondered: am I a monster, or is this what it means to be a person?” This is the question that burns through Monster Portraits, a question that is explored, teased, and unwound but never finds resolution in Sofia Samatar’s hybrid blend of fantasy and memoir. This book seeks understanding, but not definition, of the human experience of monsters and monstrousness. Sofia agreed to share her thoughts on Monster Portraits as a genre-bending speculative memoir, and how she approaches taboos and challenges and stays true to her artistic vision. MORE >>

     
  5. HOW TO FIND THE RIGHT MARKETS FOR YOUR IDEAS

Coming up with a great idea isn’t enough. As writers, we also have to find the right publication for it, and this is often easier said than done. And what if that publication turns us down? How do we know that our idea was valid, but it just wasn’t a good fit? How do we come up with alternative publications? Do we give up at some point, or do we keep going? Pinar Tarhan chats with freelancers Olga Mecking, Pauline Campos, Kristy Rice, Diane Shipley, and Debbie Weingarten on these topics and more. MORE >>

     
  6. TRACKING YOUR BANGED BUCK: MAKE SURE YOUR PR PAYS OFF

Authors are responsible for the bulk of their marketing, and there are plenty of companies willing to help-for a fee. The choice of where to spend money is important, but so is a return on investment. Devon Ellinton chats with authors K.R. Conway, Jessica Glenn, Arlene Kay, Alyssa Maxwell, and Barbara Ross about which book marketing expenses were worth the money and provided a good return, and which weren’t. She also chats with the ladies at Goddess Fish Promotions and Jessica Glenn, the “boss lady” of MindBuck© Media Book Publicity, about what services they think provide the best return from their extensive experience working with authors. MORE >>

     
  7. MAKING YOUNG READERS LAUGH

Humor is a tool all writers should have in their toolbox, but especially when writing for children. Making kids laugh while they are reading creates an emotional connection to the work and makes it a memorable experience. That connection with the reader is what all writers crave. And thanks to pioneers in children’s literature like Dr. Suess, writing fun and entertaining books for kids is a valued pursuit for writers. Kerrie Flanagan interviews Jeff Kinney (Diary of a Wimpy Kid), John Erickson (Hand the Cowdog), Gordon McAlpine (The Misadventures of Edgar and Allan Poe), Ursula Vernon (Dragonbreath), Lisa Doan (The Berenson Schemes), Devvie Dadey (Adventures of the Bailey School Kids), and literary agent Kelley Sonnack with the Andrea Brown Agency about writing humor for children. MORE >>

     
  8. YOUR WRITING NICHE IS MORE THAN A TOPIC

I’m sure you’ve read the conventional wisdom on choosing a niche: combine your passion and knowledge, keep it narrow but not too narrow, and work until you’re seen as an expert in your field. This works, sure, but for us writers it’s only half of what your niche could be. Depending on how you want to spend your work hours, there’s a whole other interpretation of the word niche because your niche is more than a topic. It can also be a specialty, a certain format or type of writing. Kristy Rice shares twenty eight specialty niches that could sustain a lucrative writing career. MORE >>

     
  9. RAISE YOUR INCOME WRITING ABOUT AGRICULTURE

Even if you’ve never mucked out a stall in your life (but especially if you have!), you can tap the profitable agricultural trade periodicals. Here's how. By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant. MORE >>

     
  10. 5 STEPS TO BUILDING A SUCCESSFUL ONLINE BUSINESS

Today, the internet offers everyone “opportunity equality.” Okay, maybe not exactly, but it does even the playing field quite a bit. As a home or small business owner, while you may not have the same marketing budget or resources as a bigger company, you do have the ability to use low cost and even free online marketing strategies to create visibility, draw traffic (people) to your website, and convert visitors into customers or clients. Here are five steps to get you on the path of success. By Karen Cioffi. MORE >>

     
  11. SPRING 2018 FLASH FICTION WINNERS

The results are in! After careful deliberation our honorable guest judge, literary agent Sharon Pelletier with DG&B Agency, has made her final decisions. Read the winning stories of the 750 words or less Spring 2018 Flash Fiction Competition. MORE >>

     
  12. Q3 2018 CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST WINNERS

Check out the results of our latest essay contest! Read the winning essays of the 1,000 words or less Q3 2018 Essay Competition. MORE >>


SERIES: TALES FROM THE TRENCHES

     
  1. MY WRITING COACH IN THE LOOKING GLASS: OVERZEALOUS MENTOR OR MONEYMAKER?

In the spring of 2012, I found myself gazing into my monitor, not knowing whether to put a period at the end of the sentence or keep going with a comma. I’d lost my home in foreclosure, gone bankrupt, written 300,000 words, and revised the body of work four times. And while I was slurping away at my 5 p.m. crutch of a Cosmo, I understood what I was really missing—a mentor. Someone who’d gone before, knew how to shape art into something salable, and who would come along with a tribe of like-minded people with whom I could collaborate. I didn’t want to go back to school. What I was looking for was beyond the confines of academia. I needed someone to touch what the poet Mary Oliver called the “wild silky” part of myself and finally, make it palatable to the world. MORE >>


COLUMN: THE SUBMISSION

     
  9. THEM FIGHTIN’ WORDS

What else are we to do with our words but ready them to face the world? By fighting like a writer, we gain confidence and hope. There will be a momentary bit of time in which you truly believe that your words are readying to stand up for themselves. As you let them go, as you submit them for publication, you’ll see that what you are doing is advocating for their success—for your success as a writer who knows how to just go for it. So go for it. Take action. Fight like a writer and give everything you have to get your words heard. MORE >>

     
  11. SUBMISSIONS FLOWCHART

Are you ready to get published? Answer the yes or no questions that walk you from a final draft to submitting your work. The links go to resources, like places to find literary journals taking submissions or Chelsey’s previous columns for advice. See if you can spot the intentional typo. This spreadsheet rocks! MORE >>

     
  12. WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN EXPECTING TO WORK WITH AN EDITOR

As writers, we might not know what it’s like to be an editor. Sure, we edit our own work, but there is more that an editor does than just fix sloppy sentences and question your metaphors. Understanding the editor’s experience of the submission-to-publication journey will help you to have frustration-free interactions with editors. MORE >>

     
  13. CHOICES, CHOICES

Chelsey Clammer answers two important questions: 1) What should I submit? and 2) Where should I submit it? She also examines publishing choices and other choices you have when it comes to writing and submitting. MORE >>

     
  14. BUILDING A COMMUNITY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BECKY TUCH, FOUNDING EDITOR OF THE REVIEW REVIEW

Writers need resources. It’s why I do the submission consultations. I know things. I share with other writers those things I know, which makes me feel helpful and engaged. Like part of a community. Writers need guidance. So here I am, guiding you to an awesome writing community that can give you a lot of support because of its uber-resourceful characteristic: The Review ReviewMORE >>

     
  15. Q&A WITH THE SUB(MISSION) COLUMNIST

We asked WOW readers to turn in questions for Chelsey to answer about submitting your work, and the response was amazing! Writers had some great questions—everything from how to tell if feedback is real and when you should give up on a piece (after what number of rejections) to tips on writing humor and how to make your submission stand out from the rest. MORE >>

     
  16. THE TRUTH OF THE MATTER

When you submit a super-personal poem, a revealing-of-others piece, or a taboo story, you have to be prepared for anybody and everybody to read your work. Because once published, you’ll need to be prepared for all types of responses, including possible backlash. MORE >>

CLASSIFIEDS

   

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How to Increase Your Writing Productivity
How to Write for Magazines That Aren’t In Your Demographics
Snail to Sprint: How to Write Your First Draft in 4 Weeks
My Writing Coach in the Looking Glass: Overzealous Mentor or Moneymaker?
Speculative Memoir: Interview with Sofia Samatar
How to Find the Right Markets for Your Ideas
Building a Community: An Interview with Becky Tuch, Founding Editor of The Review Review
Writing Humor for Children: Making Young Readers Laugh
5 Steps to Building a Successful Online Business
The Truth of the Matter
Q&A with The Sub(mission) Columnist
Raise Your Income Writing About Agricutlure
Writing About Sensitive Topics for Young Adults: Interviews with YA Authors Ellen Hopkins, Cheryl Rainfield, and Jay Asher
How to Make Sure Your Book PR Pays Off
Your Writing 
niche is More Than a Topic
What to Expect When Expecting to Work with an Editor
Telling the Story in Captions
How to Write and Publish Listicles
 
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