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Summer 2018 Flash Fiction Contest

Q4 2018 Creative Nonfiction Essay Contest

Spring 2018 Flash Fiction Contest

Q3 2018 Creative Nonfiction Essay Contest

Winter 2018 Flash Fiction Contest







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FLASH FICTION CONTEST

    WINTER FLASH FICTION CONTEST WITH GUEST JUDGE LITERARY AGENT KARI SUTHERLAND WITH BRADFORD LITERARY AGENCY

Do you need some writing inspiration? Contests are a great way to spark your creativity, and you may even win a prize! Get your best work together and consider entering the WOW! quarterly flash fiction contest with guest judge, literary agent Kari Sutherland with Bradford Literary Agency. Stop by the contest page, download the pdf guidelines, and read all about Heather’s preferences. The Winter Contest is open to all genres of fiction between 250 - 750 words. Only 300 stories are accepted, so enter early to ensure your spot in the contest. Over $1350 in cash prizes. Deadline: February 28, 2019. MORE >>

     

CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST

    Q2 CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST

WOW! is proud to introduce our newest essay contest! Writers have been asking us to host an essay contest for many years, and we’ve finally listened. The mission of this essay contest is to inspire creative nonfiction and provide well-rewarded recognition to contestants. The contest is open globally; age is of no matter; and entries must be in English. Your story must be true, but the way you tell it is your chance to get creative. We are open to all styles of essay—from personal essay to lyric essay to hybrid essay, and beyond! Word Count: 200 – 1,000 words. Only 300 stories are accepted, so enter early to ensure your spot in the contest. 1st Place: $500. Deadline: January 31, 2019. MORE >>

     

WRITING WORKSHOPS & ONLINE CLASSES

    WOW! WOMEN ON WRITING CLASSROOM

Whether you are looking to boost your income or work on your craft, we know that education is an important part of a writer’s career. That’s why WOW! handpicks qualified instructors and targeted classes that women writers will benefit from. All of the courses operate online and are taught one-on-one with the instructor. The flexibility of the platform allows students to complete assignments on their own time and work at their own pace in the comfort of their own home. Visit the classroom page and check out our current line up of workshops: fiction writing, writing for children, screenwriting, creativity, memoir, personal essay, grammar, food writing, freelance writing, novel writing, blogging, social networking for authors, independent publishing, branding for authors, poetry writing, copy editing, literary devices, working with a literary agent, writing scenes, book reviewing, travel writing and more. MORE >>

     

FEATURES

  1. AFTER NANOWRIMO: HOW TO REVISE AND EDIT YOUR MANUSCRIPT

Non-writer friends might have thought your sanity was in question when you told them you were writing an entire novel in one month—especially the month that holds Thanksgiving and the biggest shopping day of the year. But you knew what you were doing all along. You were letting go of all the structure and technique that gives writers anxiety and just writing—freely and quickly and getting a first draft down on paper. Now, it’s there, and you’re wondering, what do I do next? How do I possibly turn this freeing, supportive, and positive experience of NaNoWriMo into a publishable document without going insane? Never fear—you don’t have to go crazy during the revision process. Just follow along as we take your 50,000 plus words to a whole new level. MORE >>

     
  2. BEGINNING AFTER NANOWRIMO

Congratulations! You took part in November’s National Novel Writing Month and committed endless hours to your manuscript within a mere thirty-day span. Now it’s January. Those dishes are done, along with most of that clearance-sale Christmas candy. Your manuscript languishes somewhere in your word processing program. Even though there are a few plot holes the size of semi-trucks, a stereotypical character or two or twelve, and enough typos to make your computer groan for five minutes as the document loads, you still have hope, or at least, blissful ignorance. Where do you go from here? Beth Cato, a nine-year NaNoWriMo veteran, takes the guesswork out of the process and walks you through the necessary steps you must take to begin preparing yourself to edit, revise, and polish your manuscript. MORE >>

     
  3. RED PENCIL ROUND-UP: SELF-EDITING FOR FICTION WRITERS

You’ve finished your manuscript. You’ve celebrated the accomplishment of completing something many people dream of but never do. You’ve let your manuscript sit for at least a few weeks, and now you’re ready to begin editing. Self-editing is a lot more work than you may realize. It’s so much more than just checking for grammar and punctuation errors. You need to evaluate every part of your story: narrative, dialogue, characterization, setting, plot, etc. It’s important to ensure every aspect of your story is polished before you submit your manuscript to an agent. So, where do you start and what should you be looking for? Author and editor Annette Fix walks you through the process of editing your manuscript step-by-step.  MORE >>

     
  4. THE LAYERED EDIT: A STEP-BY-STEP MANUSCRIPT EDITING PROCESS

I’m always surprised when an aspiring writer finishes a draft, runs it through spell check, and sends it out. I’m not surprised when a writer gets a rejection. Revision is as vital as original writing. The first draft is about passion and creativity and flow. The edits give you the chance to work on structure, language usage, layer in settings and senses, and make the difference between a decent manuscript and a great one. Over the years, I’ve come up with a layered editing process that’s served me well for short stories, plays, novellas, and novels. Now, I’m going to share the process with you. These steps are done after your initial draft, but before you show anything to a trusted reader. By Devon Ellington. MORE >>

     
  5. SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE BETA READER

Before you can get to the rewriting phase, you need to know exactly what needs to be rewritten. The answer to this question varies from author to author, depending on their path to publication, but typically includes some combination of editors, copy editors, and beta readers. The first two are pretty straightforward. Beta readers, on the other hand, are hard to put a finger on. Tiffany Jansen interviews authors Jody Hedlund, Stephen Leather, Joanna Penn, and Chuck Sambuchino to find out just what beta readers are and what they do. MORE >>

     
  6. HELP! I’VE FRANKENMONSTERED MY MANUSCRIPT! WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR REVISION TECHNIQUES NEED REVISING

Many writers jump into revision with complete confidence only to find themselves alone in a dark room with their maniacal manuscript staring back via the eerie glare of a computer screen. It has happened to me (more than) once; and in fact, I was so desperate last year that I wrestled my manuscript into a suitcase and flew to New York in search of answers. Katherine Higgs-Coulthard chats with Kate Sullivan, editor at Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, and authors Jody Lamb, Barbara Shoup, and Cathy Day who share their best advice on how to tame your own Franken-novel.  MORE >>

     
  7. THE INCREDIBLE SHRUNKEN MANUSCRIPT: HOW TO DIAGNOSE YOUR NOVEL’S STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES

Without reading a single word of your novel, Darcy Pattison can tell you some of its strengths and weaknesses by using the “Shrunken Manuscript” technique. This step-by-step process can help you evaluate the big picture of a novel: the overall structure, pacing, scenes, characters, and dialogue. By following these exercises, you'll be able to change the context of the story— from large to small—and it will give you a starting place for manuscript revisions.  MORE >>

     
  8. HOW TO SELL YOUR MANUSCRIPT WITHOUT AN AGENT

It’s a common misconception that editors won’t deal with authors directly. Not only will they interact with you, but they’ll buy your book. Rachel Eddey knows this for sure because it happened to her. She had three agents try to sell her humorous memoir, Running of the Bride, with no luck for over two and a half years. As a last-ditch effort before shelving the project, she decided to represent herself—and sold it in fifteen days. Rachel shares how she did it, and interviews other authors who share how they landed a publishing contract without an agent as well. Featuring advice from Christine Clifford, author of the bestselling Not Now . . . I’m Having a No Hair Day; Janice Booth, author of Only Pack What You Can Carry; and Erin Lale, editor of Eternal Press and Damnation Books. MORE >>

     
  9. SO, WHAT DOES A LITERARY AGENT DO?

A writer’s journey to publish a book can feel much like Dorothy’s journey to visit the Wizard of Oz. There’s a definite road to follow, but it’s not always easy. The good news is that help is available in the form of literary agents. Acquiring a literary agent is not easy, but it’s usually a must if you want your book published by a big publishing house. Agents are there for writers and are the key to gaining entrance into this elusive world. Kerrie Flanagan chats with literary agents Jessica Regel and Elizabeth Evans—both with the Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency—and Kristina Holmes, founder and president of The Holmes Agency, who share not only what they do, but also specific insight to their success. MORE >>

     
  10. IMPRESSING THE GATEKEEPERS: WHAT AGENTS AND EDITORS SEEK IN SUBMISSIONS

If you’ve put a year into writing your book, you should put in a few extra hours towards proofreading, crafting a strong query letter, and researching your target agents and markets. Devon Ellington chats with Jessica Faust, literary agent and owner of BookEnds, LLC; Heather Osborn, editorial director of Samhain Publishing; and Stephany Evans, literary agent and president of FinePrint Literary Management, who share their best advice on submissions. Included is a helpful section on cover letters! MORE >>

     
  11. SUMMER 2018 FLASH FICTION WINNERS

The results are in! After careful deliberation our honorable guest judge, literary agent Jennifer Thompson with the Nordlyset Literary Agency, has made her final decisions. Read the winning stories of the 750 words or less Summer 2018 Flash Fiction Competition. MORE >>

     
  12. Q4 2018 CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST WINNERS

Check out the results of our latest essay contest! Read the winning essays of the 1,000 words or less Q4 2018 Essay Competition. MORE >>


SERIES: TALES FROM THE TRENCHES

     
  1. MY WRITING COACH IN THE LOOKING GLASS: OVERZEALOUS MENTOR OR MONEYMAKER?

In the spring of 2012, I found myself gazing into my monitor, not knowing whether to put a period at the end of the sentence or keep going with a comma. I’d lost my home in foreclosure, gone bankrupt, written 300,000 words, and revised the body of work four times. And while I was slurping away at my 5 p.m. crutch of a Cosmo, I understood what I was really missing—a mentor. Someone who’d gone before, knew how to shape art into something salable, and who would come along with a tribe of like-minded people with whom I could collaborate. I didn’t want to go back to school. What I was looking for was beyond the confines of academia. I needed someone to touch what the poet Mary Oliver called the “wild silky” part of myself and finally, make it palatable to the world. MORE >>

     
  2. FINGER GONE ROGUE, WRITING GONE MUTE

I type with nine fingers instead of ten. Not by choice! Holding the rogue finger above the keys, I make mistakes, correct them, and start again. The cause? On July 23, 2017, it is red, swollen, and throbbing with pain that I’ve put up with for four months now. The doctor lances it due to a fungal infection. Now two days later on July 25th, she unwraps the wound on my left middle finger. Stunned, we both gasp at the blackened fingertip. She calls it necrotic. I’ve seen frostbitten hands on TV look like this before. “We don’t want you losing that finger,” she says. MORE >>

     
  3. MILLIONAIRE DAYDREAMS

I used to daydream, and say that I would be a millionaire by forty, hoping that the laws of attraction would bring it to fruition. My 40th birthday came, and I had nothing but a broken heart, some of my clothes, my laptop computer, important documents, and that book bag with my pages, wondering if it would ever become a book. Nonetheless, I pulled those crumpled pages from that bag and typed out those words to create chapter after chapter. The chapters in my life also began to unfold. MORE >>

     
  4. JUST SAY NO, OR BEING A BITCH FOR MY ART

I know I’m not the only writer—especially not the only woman writer (after all, aren’t we supposed to be endlessly giving, eternally nurturing?)—who receives such requests on a regular basis. How frequently are we told of someone’s aunt, niece, little brother, daughter, etc. who is so talented and whose writing is so amazing, they know we’d love to read it and help them get it published? I’m sure that they think “getting something published” must be easy. After all, we do it, right? MORE >>

     
  5. MY FAVORITE REJECTION LETTER

What writing mountain are you eager to conquer? As for me, in 2005, my writing Kilimanjaro was to publish my history article in a children’s periodical. I took my quest seriously: I read back issues of Cobblestone and Calliope magazines, studied their guidelines, sent out one pitch after another—and all this labor resulted in numerous rejections. At some point, I understood that I aimed at the mountain too high for me and started to look for other suitable and less competitive markets. I believed that there had to be a publication whose editor would appreciate my passion for history, writing style, and diligent research. MORE >>


COLUMN: THE SUBMISSION

     
  13. CHOICES, CHOICES

Chelsey Clammer answers two important questions: 1) What should I submit? and 2) Where should I submit it? She also examines publishing choices and other choices you have when it comes to writing and submitting. MORE >>

     
  14. BUILDING A COMMUNITY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BECKY TUCH, FOUNDING EDITOR OF THE REVIEW REVIEW

Writers need resources. It’s why I do the submission consultations. I know things. I share with other writers those things I know, which makes me feel helpful and engaged. Like part of a community. Writers need guidance. So here I am, guiding you to an awesome writing community that can give you a lot of support because of its uber-resourceful characteristic: The Review ReviewMORE >>

     
  15. Q&A WITH THE SUB(MISSION) COLUMNIST

We asked WOW readers to turn in questions for Chelsey to answer about submitting your work, and the response was amazing! Writers had some great questions—everything from how to tell if feedback is real and when you should give up on a piece (after what number of rejections) to tips on writing humor and how to make your submission stand out from the rest. MORE >>

     
  16. THE TRUTH OF THE MATTER

When you submit a super-personal poem, a revealing-of-others piece, or a taboo story, you have to be prepared for anybody and everybody to read your work. Because once published, you’ll need to be prepared for all types of responses, including possible backlash. MORE >>

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After NaNoWriMo: How to Revise Your Manuscript
Beginning After NaNoWriMo
Red Pencil Round-Up: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers
The Layered Edit
Shedding Light on the Beta Reader
How to Diagnose Your Novel’s Strengths and Weaknesses
How to Revise Your Frankenmonster Manuscript
How to Sell Your Manuscript without an Agent
What Does a Literary Agent Do?
What Does a Literary Agent Do?
Millionaire Daydreams
Just Say No, or Being a Bitch for My Art
Just Say No, or Being a Bitch for My Art
Finger Gone Rogue, Writing Gone Mute
My Writing Coach in the Looking Glass: Overzealous Mentor or Moneymaker?
Self-Publishing Mistakes I Made (And How I’m Fixing Them
Pay-to-Publish Companies: Are They All Out to Get You?
How to Increase Your Writing Productivity
How to Write for Magazines That Aren’t In Your Demographics
Speculative Memoir: Interview with Sofia Samatar
How to Find the Right Markets for Your Ideas
Writing Humor for Children: Making Young Readers Laugh
How to Make Sure Your Book PR Pays Off
What to Expect When Expecting to Work with an Editor
 
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