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Spring 2017 Flash Fiction Contest Winners

Winter 2017 Flash Fiction Contest Winners

Fall 2016 Flash Fiction Contest Winners

Summer 2016 Flash Fiction Contest Winners




Humor Writing - 4 week writing workshop with Chelsey Clammer



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Read a thousand books and your words will flow like a river. ~ Virginia Woolf

FALL 2017 FLASH FICTION CONTEST

    FALL 2017 FLASH FICTION CONTEST WITH GUEST JUDGE LITERARY AGENT STEPHANIE HANSEN

Do you need some writing inspiration? Contests are a great way to spark your creativity, and you may even win a prize! Get your best work together and consider entering the WOW! quarterly flash fiction contest with guest judge, literary agent Stephanie Hansen with Metamorphosis Literary Agency. Stop by the contest page, download the pdf guidelines, and read all about Stephanie’s preferences. The Fall Contest is open to all genres of fiction between 250 - 750 words. Only 300 stories are accepted, so enter early to ensure your spot in the contest. This season, we've raised the cash prizes! Deadline: November 30, 2017. MORE >>

     

CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST

    QUARTER 1 CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST

WOW! is proud to introduce our newest essay contest! Writers have been asking us to host an essay contest for many years, and we’ve finally listened. The mission of this essay contest is to inspire creative nonfiction and provide well-rewarded recognition to contestants. The contest is open globally; age is of no matter; and entries must be in English. Your story must be true, but the way you tell it is your chance to get creative. We are open to all styles of essay—from personal essay to lyric essay to hybrid essay, and beyond! Word Count: 200 – 1,000 words. Only 300 stories are accepted, so enter early to ensure your spot in the contest. 1st Place: $500. Deadline: October 31, 2017. MORE >>

     

WRITING WORKSHOPS & ONLINE CLASSES

    WOW! WOMEN ON WRITING CLASSROOM

Whether you are looking to boost your income or work on your craft, we know that education is an important part of a writer’s career. That’s why WOW! handpicks qualified instructors and targeted classes that women writers will benefit from. All of the courses operate online and are taught one-on-one with the instructor. The flexibility of the platform allows students to complete assignments on their own time and work at their own pace in the comfort of their own home. Visit the classroom page and check out our current line up of workshops: fiction writing, writing for children, screenwriting, creativity, memoir, personal essay, grammar, food writing, freelance writing, novel writing, blogging, social networking for authors, independent publishing, branding for authors, poetry writing, copy editing, literary devices, working with a literary agent, writing scenes, book reviewing, travel writing and more. MORE >>

     

FEATURES

  1. WRITING ABOUT SENSITIVE TOPICS FOR YOUNG ADULTS: ELLEN HOPKINS, CHERYL RAINFIELD, AND JAY ASHER

For YA authors Ellen Hopkins, Cheryl Rainfield, and Jay Asher, no topic is off limits. Between the three of them, they have addressed subjects like suicide, drug abuse, cutting, prostitution, and sexual abuse. Each of their books has received high acclaim and awards alongside criticism for writing about such controversial topics for young people. Despite the critics, they plan to continue to give teens a voice by writing books about sensitive topics and showing their readers, they are not alone. Kerrie Flanagan interviews these authors about writing for young adults. MORE >>

     
  2. HOW TO BE A SUCCESSFUL INTERNATIONAL FREELANCE WRITER & HOW FIVE INTERNATIONAL WRITERS GOT THEIR FIRST BREAK

Being an international writer can be tricky. Freelancer problems like getting paid on time, proving your writing capabilities, meeting clients on a mutually optimal time, and keeping up with trends become a bit more problematic when you are in a different country or even on a different continent than your clients. But this post isn’t about the challenges. It’s about how to become a successful international writer via tips from writers who have overcome these issues and got that seemingly elusive first break. Pinar Tarhan (Turkey) shares the story of landing her first three gigs. She chats with international freelancers Olga Mecking (The Netherlands), Bernadette Geyer (Germany), Gila Green (Israel), and Suchi Rudra (digital nomad) about how they got their first break. She also shares her personal go-to list of online resources for freelance writers. MORE >>

     
  3. TRACKING YOUR BANGED BUCK: MAKE SURE YOUR PR PAYS OFF

Authors are responsible for the bulk of their marketing, and there are plenty of companies willing to help-for a fee. The choice of where to spend money is important, but so is a return on investment. Devon Ellinton chats with authors K.R. Conway, Jessica Glenn, Arlene Kay, Alyssa Maxwell, and Barbara Ross about which book marketing expenses were worth the money and provided a good return, and which weren’t. She also chats with the ladies at Goddess Fish Promotions and Jessica Glenn, the “boss lady” of MindBuck© Media Book Publicity, about what services they think provide the best return from their extensive experience working with authors. MORE >>

     
  4. LITERARY AGENT TO INDIE AUTHORS: STEPHANIE PHILLIPS OF SBR MEDIA

Last year, I signed with literary agent Stephanie Phillips of SBR Media. She was a new agent, but came highly recommended by a few of my author friends. After having self-published around thirty novels, I knew exactly what I was looking for in an agent. I needed someone who could assist me in more ways than simply securing traditional deals. After one phone conversation with Stephanie, I knew she was the right one for me. She understood the uniqueness of the indie market, but also had insight into traditional publishing as well. Signing with her has been a joy. Not only did she help me obtain my first traditional book deal, but she’s assisted me in my self-published releases; and more than that, she’s become a trusted confidant and friend. That’s why I’m excited to introduce you to her. By Amber Garza. MORE >>

     
  5. DANICA DAVIDSON: FROM REJECTION TO SEVENTEEN BOOK CONTRACTS

Danica Davidson has an amazing success story to share. What you can learn from her are several lessons, including: you never know where an assignment will lead you and persistence most definitely brings success. After you read her personal journey of being rejected for years and now having contracts for seventeen books (yes, seventeen!), we’re sure you’ll be busy figuring out how to pursue your own dreams and create a pathway to writing success. Interview by Margo L. Dill. MORE >>

     
  6. MAKING YOUNG READERS LAUGH

Humor is a tool all writers should have in their toolbox, but especially when writing for children. Making kids laugh while they are reading creates an emotional connection to the work and makes it a memorable experience. That connection with the reader is what all writers crave. And thanks to pioneers in children’s literature like Dr. Suess, writing fun and entertaining books for kids is a valued pursuit for writers. Kerrie Flanagan interviews Jeff Kinney (Diary of a Wimpy Kid), John Erickson (Hand the Cowdog), Gordon McAlpine (The Misadventures of Edgar and Allan Poe), Ursula Vernon (Dragonbreath), Lisa Doan (The Berenson Schemes), Devvie Dadey (Adventures of the Bailey School Kids), and literary agent Kelley Sonnack with the Andrea Brown Agency about writing humor for children. MORE >>

     
  7. HOW TO WRITE WITH (OR DESPITE) KIDS

As co-editor of the Literary Reflections Department at Literary Mama, I see a lot of submissions along the lines of, “It’s so hard to write with kids.” While we look for essays that delve more deeply into the ways in which writing informs the parenting experience and vice versa, this premise is so true it hurts—writing with kids is hard. I know; I have a fifteen-year-old and eleven-year-old twins. It was hard when they were babies and toddlers, and it’s hard now that they’re tweens and teens. Yet, it wasn’t until I had kids that I felt I had something worth writing about. Before kids, my writing lacked focus, purpose, passion. I always assumed I’d have time to become a writer later, in some distant future. Once my kids were born, writing took on an urgency I could not ignore. I had to get the words down on paper. By Andrea Lani. MORE >>

     
  8. YOUR WRITING NICHE IS MORE THAN A TOPIC

I’m sure you’ve read the conventional wisdom on choosing a niche: combine your passion and knowledge, keep it narrow but not too narrow, and work until you’re seen as an expert in your field. This works, sure, but for us writers it’s only half of what your niche could be. Depending on how you want to spend your work hours, there’s a whole other interpretation of the word niche because your niche is more than a topic. It can also be a specialty, a certain format or type of writing. Kristy Rice shares twenty eight specialty niches that could sustain a lucrative writing career. MORE >>

     
  9. TELLING THE STORY IN CAPTIONS: WRITING CUTLINES FOR PICTORIAL HISTORIES

Thousands of historians, preservationists, and yes, authors begin their published careers writing pictorial histories. Some writers move on beyond this niche while others find themselves at home relaying the histories of their communities, counties, regions, or highways indefinitely. There are challenges with writing to the image, but with a few guidelines in mind, caption-writing can be a fine-tuned skill. Author Cheryl Eichar Jett has written six pictorial history books for Arcadia Publishing and over a hundred historical articles with captioned images, and shares her best tips for breaking into this niche market. MORE >>

     
  10. MAXIMIZING THE MINIMUM: POWER AND URGENCY IN NONFICTION – AN INTERVIEW WITH BREVITY’S MANAGING EDITOR KELLY SUNDBERG

Kelly Sundberg is managing editor of Brevity: A Journal of Concise Literary Nonfiction. Published quarterly, Brevity features extremely brief (750 words or less) essays by well-known and emerging writers as well as essays on craft and book reviews. In addition to her role as editor, Kelly is an acclaimed author, a doctoral candidate at Ohio University, and the single parent of a ten-year-old boy. Kelly began her blog, Apology not Accepted, after receiving a court-ordered letter of apology from her abusive ex-husband. Katherine Higgs-Coulthard chats with Kelly about survival, balance, and writing short. MORE >>

     
  11. SPRING 2017 FLASH FICTION WINNERS

The results are in! After careful deliberation our honorable guest judge, literary agent Claire Roberts with Trident Media Group, has made her final decisions. Read the winning stories of the 750 words or less Spring 2017 Flash Fiction Competition. MORE >>


COLUMN: THE SUBMISSION

  6. THE SUBMISSION: CARING ABOUT COVER LETTERS

The following column explores the different ways one can write a cover letter when submitting a piece of writing to a journal or magazine for publication. This column looks at a number of styles and tones an author may consider when writing a cover letter, and how those elements could be tinkered with according to the actual piece that is being submitted and where. It also points out the standard aspects of a cover letter to include. This column is 1330 words and is not under consideration elsewhere. I have specifically written it for you. By Chelsey Clammer. MORE >>

     
  7. THE SUBMISSION: HOW TO HOLD YOUR HORSES

Patience. Writers don’t just need it, but we need the unabridged herculean edition of it. Because after we submit a piece for publication, it truly feels like we’re just waiting for the waiting to end. There are times that this waiting can feel overwhelming. It can distract us and make us feel obsessed. It can make it hard to concentrate on other pieces of writing. But wait we must because there is not one thing about the writing process we can rush. By Chelsey Clammer. MORE >>

     
  8. BREATHE AND PROCEED: POET TAMMY ROBACKER ON HOW TO SUBMIT THE HARD STUFF

Submitting is an act of vulnerability: to take what you’ve written and then subject it to being assessed by someone else. Someone you don’t know. Whether you’re an essayist putting your darkest moments on the page or a novelist who creates a potentially risky plot, submitting the words you birthed is a brave act. Tammy Robacker, an award-winning poet and author of the recently released Villain Songs, knows all about this. Her poems grapple with and explore complex topics, such as family, loss, grief, the body, women’s issues, and many other kinds of difficult emotional subject matter. In the following interview, Robacker provides a number of helpful suggestions for all writers who are confronting the submission process with their pages brimming with hard subjects. MORE >>

     
  9. WRITING CONTESTS: YOU HAVE NOTHING TO LOSE

Statistics tells you not to do this. Don’t bother submitting to a writing contest because you aren’t going to win. The chances of winning the contest are so small that I actually wrote out the exact percentage here: ___ %, but you can’t see what number I typed out because it’s just that small. Who in their right mind would be crazy enough to even think about pursuing a literary victory with such microscopic odds in their favor? Well, us, of course. Writers. We’re all kinds of crazy. MORE >>

     
  10. THEM FIGHTIN’ WORDS

What else are we to do with our words but ready them to face the world? By fighting like a writer, we gain confidence and hope. There will be a momentary bit of time in which you truly believe that your words are readying to stand up for themselves. As you let them go, as you submit them for publication, you’ll see that what you are doing is advocating for their success—for your success as a writer who knows how to just go for it. So go for it. Take action. Fight like a writer and give everything you have to get your words heard. MORE >>

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Writing Humor for Children: Making Young Readers Laugh
How Five International Freelance Writers Got Their First Break
Writing About Sensitive Topics for Young Adults: Interviews with YA Authors Ellen Hopkins, Cheryl Rainfield, and Jay Asher
How to Make Sure Your Book PR Pays Off
Literary Agent to Indie Authors: Stephanie Phillips of SBR Media
Danica Davidson: From Rejection to 17 Book Contracts
Your Writing 
niche is More Than a Topic
How to Write With (Or Despite) Kids by Andrea Lani
Fight Like a Writer
Writing Contests
How to Submit the Hard Stuff
How to Hold Your Horses
Caring About Cover Letters (because nothing says
Telling the Story in Captions
Making Short Work of Your Digital Platform
Interview with Brevity's Managing Editor Kelly Sundberg
How to Write and Publish Listicles
Your Book's Tagline: Make It Snappy
 
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